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If there are 5 girls in your family and 2 hav ehad breast cancer what are the odds you will get it

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Understanding the Risk of Breast Cancer in a Family with 5 Girls and 2 Cases

Breast cancer is a concerning health issue that affects many women around the world. If you have a family history of breast cancer, it is natural to wonder about your own risk. This article aims to provide a simple and easy-to-understand explanation of the odds of developing breast cancer when there are 5 girls in your family, and 2 of them have had breast cancer.

I. Understanding the Risk Factors:

  1. Family History: A family history of breast cancer can increase your risk.
  2. Genetic Factors: Certain gene mutations, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, can also increase the risk.
  3. Age: The risk of developing breast cancer increases with age.

II. Assessing the Odds:

  1. Statistical Perspective: The odds of developing breast cancer depend on various factors, including family history and genetic predisposition.
  2. Individual Risk: It is important to remember that even with a family history, the odds of developing breast cancer can vary for each person.

III. Benefits of Knowing the Odds:

  1. Early Detection: Understanding your risk can motivate you to undergo regular breast cancer screenings, leading to early detection and better treatment outcomes.
As with all types of breast cancer, what exactly causes HER2-positive breast cancer is unknown. It's likely a combination of risk factors, including lifestyle and environment. Genetics are also thought to play a role. However, the HER2 gene is not inherited from parents and can't be passed on to children.

How likely am I to get breast cancer if my mom has it?

Having a first-degree relative (mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer almost doubles a woman's risk. Having 2 first-degree relatives increases her risk by about 3-fold. Women with a father or brother who has had breast cancer also have a higher risk of breast cancer.

Is HER2 mutation hereditary?

That said, HER2 positive breast cancer is not hereditary – you can't inherit a bad HER2 gene from a parent or pass one on to a child.

What increases risk of HER2-positive breast cancer?

Being female (although rare, men can also develop breast cancer) Having a family history of breast cancer (this does not apply to HER2 positive breast cancers, which are not considered to be hereditary) Giving birth for the first time after age 30. Receiving radiation therapy to the chest.

Which parent passes on breast cancer gene?

A harmful variant in BRCA1 or BRCA2 can be inherited from either parent. Each child of a parent who carries any mutation in one of these genes has a 50% chance (or 1 in 2 chance) of inheriting the mutation. Inherited mutations—also called germline mutations or variants—are present from birth in all cells in the body.

What is considered a strong family history of breast cancer?

Two or more first– or second-degree relatives from the same side of the family with breast cancer, if at least one breast cancer was diagnosed before age 50.

Will I get breast cancer if I have both sides of the family?

Having a first-degree relative (mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer almost doubles a woman's risk. Having 2 first-degree relatives increases her risk by about 3-fold. Women with a father or brother who has had breast cancer also have a higher risk of breast cancer.

Frequently Asked Questions

How many years do breast cancer survivors live?

The overall 5-year relative survival rate for breast cancer is 90%. This means 90 out of 100 women are alive 5 years after they've been diagnosed with breast cancer. The 10-year breast cancer relative survival rate is 84% (84 out of 100 women are alive after 10 years).

What emotion is tied to breast cancer?

If you have recently been diagnosed with breast cancer or any other cancer, you may be experiencing a wide variety of emotions: fear, anger, sadness, guilt, helplessness, and anxiety.

Which parent carries the breast cancer gene?

Everyone has two copies of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, one copy inherited from their mother and one from their father. Even if a person inherits a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation from one parent, they still have the normal copy of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene from the other parent.

Should I get tested for breast cancer if my mom has it?

Genetic counseling before genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer is important to determine whether you and your family are likely enough to have a mutation that it is worth getting tested. Usually, genetic testing is recommended if you have: A strong family health history of breast and ovarian cancer.

FAQ

Can you live for 30 years after breast cancer?
Many people survive for years or even decades after getting a breast cancer diagnosis and receiving treatment. Typically, the earlier a doctor diagnoses and treats the condition, the better a person's outlook. Regular follow-up appointments are important for monitoring a person's health after breast cancer treatment.
Who is the biggest predictor of breast cancer?
A woman's risk for breast cancer is higher if she has a mother, sister, or daughter (first-degree relative) or multiple family members on either her mother's or father's side of the family who have had breast or ovarian cancer. Having a first-degree male relative with breast cancer also raises a woman's risk.
Am I at risk for breast cancer if my aunt has had it?
If one or more of these relatives has had breast or ovarian cancer, your own risk is significantly higher. If a grandmother, aunt or cousin has been diagnosed with the disease, your personal risk is usually not significantly changed, unless many of these "second-degree relatives" have had the disease.
Who is considered a first degree relative for breast cancer?
Having a mother, sister or daughter (first degree relative) diagnosed with breast cancer approximately doubles the risk of breast cancer.

If there are 5 girls in your family and 2 hav ehad breast cancer what are the odds you will get it

Who is most likely to inherit breast cancer? Women of Ashkenazi or Eastern European Jewish heritage also have an increased risk of breast cancer because they may be more likely to have inherited a BRCA1 gene mutation. Breast cancer is least commonly diagnosed in Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native women.
How likely am I to get cancer if my aunt had it? It's estimated that between 3 and 10 in every 100 cancers are associated with an inherited faulty gene. Cancers caused by inherited faulty genes are much less common than those caused by other factors, such as ageing, smoking, being overweight and not exercising regularly, or not eating a healthy, balanced diet.
How likely are you to get breast cancer if it doesn t run in your family? While breast cancer can be hereditary, 75% of women who get breast cancer have no family history of the disease. You can get breast cancer even if it does not run in your family, so it's very important to have an annual exam and mammogram to detect breast cancer early and receive treatment.
  • How common is breast cancer with no family history?
    • However, breast cancers resulting from familial or genetic predisposition are thought to account for only 15% to 20% of all diagnosed cases; this means that 80% to 85% of breast cancers are occurring in women with no family history of the disease.
  • How long can breast cancer go undetected?
    • All cancers begin as asymptomatic, and all tumors start so small they are undetectable. You can have breast cancer without knowing it for several years, depending on how quickly it starts, grows, and spreads.
  • What puts you at higher risk for breast cancer?
    • A woman's risk for breast cancer is higher if she has a mother, sister, or daughter (first-degree relative) or multiple family members on either her mother's or father's side of the family who have had breast or ovarian cancer. Having a first-degree male relative with breast cancer also raises a woman's risk.